Facebook

Twitter

LinkedIn

 

automobile Tag

Can Police Search Your Car for Drugs Without Your Permission?

Can Police Search Your Car for Drugs Without Your Permission?

When the police pull you over on the roadside, sometimes they can search your car for drugs without your permission. Vehicle searches are legal under some circumstances if you are being arrested. Also, the police can do a search if they have probable cause to believe that a crime is being committed. Finally, they can seize any item in plain view. Search Incident to Arrest When you are being arrested for driving under the influence of drugs, DUI, or another crime on the roadside, the police can search your car if: They reasonably believe evidence of the crime you committed can be...

Continue reading

How Cops Find Drugs During Traffic Stops

How Cops Find Drugs During Traffic Stops

A person pulled over for suspected DUI or another driving offense may find himself in more trouble if police search the vehicle. If law enforcement finds evidence of another crime, such as illegal drugs, in the vehicle, they can charge you with that crime too. A simple traffic infraction could escalate to much more serious criminal charges. Usually, police need a warrant to search cars. During traffic stops, however, they can search vehicles without a warrant for several reasons. First, police may search a vehicle incident to a driver’s arrest. Often this type of search is legally permitted because police reasonably...

Continue reading

Legality of the Car Search in Oklahoma

Legality of the Car Search in Oklahoma

During DUI arrests in Oklahoma, police may be able to legally search the driver’s automobile. But wait – you may say – doesn’t the Fourth Amendment protect people against unreasonable searches and seizures of their property? Yes, and so does Article 2, Section 30 of the Oklahoma Constitution. However, several exceptions apply during traffic stops that could allow police to search your car. Police usually must have a search warrant to conduct an automobile search. If there was no warrant, the courts assume that the search was unreasonable, and the government must demonstrate that the search was reasonable. Otherwise, evidence from...

Continue reading